How Does Asbestos Removal Work?

1Ever since the 1970s, we have learned in the United States that asbestos causes cancer. Now that we know better, we are trying to remove all the asbestos found in homes. Workers and others may still come into contact with the cancer-causing material. Asbestos was thought to be a good invention, which is why it was used in thousands of building materials, consumer goods, and other random products. Asbestos was a cheap, durable, and fire-resistant additive to manufactured products. Asbestos has since been banned in modern times.

Asbestos abatement is best done wearing protective gear that prevents the worker from breathing in particles. There are government-sponsored rules and regulations in place to prevent people from exposure to cancer-causing airborne asbestos fibers. Federal laws are set up to prevent the removal of asbestos in an unsafe manner. Some could unintentionally expose themselves or others to asbestos materials. Asbestos exposure can cause malignant mesothelioma, asbestos-related lung cancers, and asbestosis. Airborne asbestos cannot be seen with the naked eye, and inhaled asbestos lodges itself in the organs such as the heart, lungs, or abdomen, causing health issues many years later after the onset of exposure.

In order to prevent exposure to asbestos, a breathing apparatus has to be used so as not to breathe in the toxicity of the material. Asbestos was previously used in thousands of building products and in 1985, made up 20% of public and private buildings including residential apartment buildings containing friable asbestos. Asbestos can be found inside the following home materials, such as caulking, cement sheeting, concrete, electrical breakers, millboard, plasters, roof shingles/felt, sheetrock, siding, textured popcorn ceilings/ceiling tiles, vinyl floor tiles, and wiring. Asbestos was not only used in homes but in schools and company buildings, which is why in modern times, we try to remove it.

Read additional information at asbestos testing.